Cocktail List

Old School Attitude

Modern Day Speakeasy

Ours is a modern day speakeasy with an old-school attitude to liquor.
We celebrate ‘classic’ cocktails (Prohibition Classics) which venerate the raw ingredients, so-called ‘new pansies’ (New Pansy List) which were designed to mask the taste of rough moonshine, and also ‘modern’ cocktails (21st Amendment List) which bring cocktail making into a new level of art form, courtesy of our Cocktail Maestro, Charles.

And of course if you have a favourite cocktail not listed here please talk to our bartenders who will be seriously happy to discuss any other libations of which you may like to partake.

Whatever your mood, delight or delectation, we are sure you will enjoy your step back in time to the era of the Social Club.

Prohibition Classics

‘classic’ cocktails which venerate the raw ingredients

The Algonquin

Named after the Algonquin Round Table, a group of New York writers,
actors, and critics that would meet at The Algonquin Hotel, Manhattan, for lunch every day from 1919 to 1929. Over lunch was simply good witty banter between the greats of American literature at the time.
Rye, Dry Vermouth, and Pineapple Juice

$16

The Income Tax

You thought doing your taxes are bad now? It was worse in the 1920’s. So bad a drink was created to survive the tax season. And like one’s taxes, it starts off smooth with a bitter finish.
Gin, Dry Vermouth, Sweet Vermouth, Orange Juice, and Bitters

$19

Clover Club

Named after the Philadelphia’s men’s club of the same name it predates prohibition, appearing in publications around 1910. A distinguished gentleman’s drink, it was the mark of distinction in
anyone’s hand.
Gin, Grenadine , Lemon Juice, Egg White

$17.5

The Scofflaw

Created in Harry’s Bar in Paris in 1924, the ‘Scofflaw’ was the word given to those who drank during prohibition, when it was illegal. The meaning of the word came from one who would ‘scoff’ at the law.
Rye, Dry Vermouth, Lemon Juice, and Grenadine

$18

The Martinez

First published in ‘The Modern Bartender’ in 1884, the Matrinez was described as a Manhattan but with gin instead of whisky. Popularised at the Occidental Hotel in San Francisco by people traveling to Martinez, it was also the pre-cursor to the infamous dry martini that all gin lovers know and love.
Gin, Sweet Vermouth, Maraschino Liqueur, Angostura Bitters

$21

Blood and Sand

Named after the Rudolph Valentino Bullfighting movie, in 1922, the drink was created for the premier of the movie.
Scotch, Cherry Heering, Sweet Vermouth, Orange juice.

$17.5

Blue Moon

Coming from the amazingness that was Joel’s Café around 1912, The Blue Moon was the house cocktail at Joel’s. Joel’s café was that place to be in New York during this era. Twenty singer caba- ret, shows, and a whole music floor, the perfect example of the glamour the roaring 20’s was known for.
Gin, Lemon Juice, Crème De Violette

$19

Mary Pickford

Created by Fred Kaufman at the Hotel Nacional de Cuba in Havana in the early 20’s for actress Mary Pickford, while visiting with her husband Douglas Fairbanks and Charlie Chaplin.
Rum, pineapple, Grenadine, maraschino

$14.5

New Pansies

mixes designed to mask the taste of rough moonshine

Twentieth Century Cocktail

Created by C.A. Tuck in 1937, in honour of the Twentieth Cen- tury Limited train line that ran from Manhattan to Chicago from 1902 to 1967. The Twentieth Century Limited trains were the exclusive and sophisticated way to travel, with red carpet laid out at each end for the guests arriving and departing (where the term ‘Red Carpet Treatment’ originated from). If the Art deco of this era had taste, it would be this!
Gin, Americano Cocchi, Lemon Juice, Crème de Cacao.

$22

The Corpse Reviver # 2

The Infamous Corpse Reviver saw print around the 1930’s in the Savoy Cocktail book. Essentially a drink that can ‘revive any corpse’ or in lay-person’s terms, make that hangover possibly tol- erable. When researching about the Corpse Reviver, we found the quote “Best served the day after your birthday. Even though you’re old enough to know better – shame on you” You can’t teach an old dog new tricks I suppose; Corpse Reviver #2 please!
Gin, Cointreau, Lemon Juice, Americano Cocchi, Absinthe

$22

Grasshopper

The Grasshopper’s genesis dates back to 1920’s New Orleans, a bar called Tujagues. Philibert Guichet, creator of the icon drink apparently entered it in a cocktail competition in New York around the late 1920’s which ironically is in the thick of Prohibi- tion, and placed second with the Grasshopper. Consisting of Creme de Menthe, Creme de Cacao and Cream, its always been somewhat of a guilty pleasure, even if some won’t admit it. The 80’s was a dark time for this cocktail (like many during that era) and through the use of low quality ingredients or ridic- ulous garnishes, the Grasshopper gained a bit of a bad rap. So after a recent trip to Tujagues, we found that a touch of brandy doesn’t go astray. At all. Seriously. It’s amazing.
Creme de Menthe, Creme de Cacao, Cream, Cognac.

$18.5

The Royal Bermuda Yacht Club

Established 1844, the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club is one of the three oldest clubs with a Royal warrant outside of the British Isles. Mainly populated by the British Army’s 20th regiment, this was the clubs official drink
Rum, Lime, Cointreau, Falernum

$19

Suffering Bastard

In 1947 bartender Joe Scialom came up with this drink as an epic hangover cure. Consisting of Cognac, Gin, Lime Cordial and Gin- ger Beer it did exactly that, cured the hangover and almost started the next night out. During the Second World War, with good whisky being scarce and cheap whisky being more available, it’s rumoured that the English asked Joe to make 8
gallons of Suffering Bastard in his bar, which at the time was The Shepherds Hotel in Cairo, Egypt, and send it to the front line to help the soldiers with their savage hangovers so they could con- tinue to function. So if last night was a big night, this is sure to help you soldier on. Trust us. Tested extensively.
It works a treat.
Cognac, Gin, Lime, Ginger Beer, Angostura Bitters

$18.5

Sidecar

There are various backstories to the Sidecar. The famous being Harry’s New York Bar, Paris, in the 1920’s. An American army captain, who had a motorcycle with a sidecar, enjoyed a warm- ing drink before dinner but drinking cognac neat was frowned upon so early in the evening. So he mixed it with Cointreau and Lemon Juice. Hence the Sidecar was born!
Cognac, Lemon Juice, Cointreau

$18

Chatham Hotel Special

The signature drink of the Chatham Hotel in New York during the 1920’s. Being hailed as an amazing dessert drink by cocktail aficionados, we are very inclined to agree
Cognac, Ruby Port, Dark Crème de Cacao

$18

The Blinker

A ‘Blinker’ was another term for a blinder, the device you would outfit a horse or mule to keep its eyes on the road. I love how during prohibition people dedicated drinks to everything!
Rye Whisky, Grapefruit Juice, Raspberry Syrup.

$14

Twenty First Amendment

modern cocktails which bring cocktail making into a new level of art form

Summers Radiance

Remember Summer? Yeah we miss it too.
Take the essence & flavours of summer and top with prosecco
Passionfruit Vodka, Lime juice, Guava syrup, Peach bitters Sparkling wine

$16

Cuban Daze

A drink that pay homage to drinking in Cuba during Prohibition.
Rum, Quick Brown Fox Coffee Liqueur , Lime, Orgeat, Vanilla
Smoke, Egg White

$19.5

Just Blaze

Any bartender worth their salt will tell you how Jerry Thomas is the Godfather of bartending, and how the most famous pic- ture is of him is doing a Blue Blazer. Pouring fire from one cup to another. Surprise, surprise we like fire too!
O.P rum, Dark Crème De Cacao ,Old Fashioned Bitters

$15.5

Phoenix Flower Tea

Tropical tea that accentuates the flavours in the gin, to bring your taste buds back to life. Best cuppa you’ll have in a long while.
Gin, Tropical Tea, Canton Liqueur, Lemon juice

$16

Bianco Broad

Sweet Vermouth, with citrus and elderflower syrup, top with soda. With a frozen grape injected with dry vermouth. Light with a dry finish. Charles’ favourite broad…
Bianco Vermouth, Lemon Juice, Elderflower Syrup , Soda

$16

86 The Drink

In kitchen terms to ‘86’ something is to be out of it, or have none left, or in bar terms – to get rid of. It dates back to the Prohibition era, to a bar in New York City called Chumleys. Chumleys had a ‘monetary agreement’ with the police, so be- fore raids were to happen, the police would ring beforehand and tell the bartender to get everyone out of the bar on the 86 Bedford St door, while they came in another entrance on Pame- la Court. In this case it’s the cocktail special of the night. Or the ‘surprise me’ drink, if you will.

POA

Cavaliers Cup

The Poplar Social Club’s twist on the Negroni. Rye whisky based with subtle orange and coffee notes.
Rye Whisky, Aperol, Coffee & Fig Syrup, Sweet Vermouth

$17

Solaa-Oneness

A drink based on the song Oneness from the band Solaa, formed right here in our garden city in 1997. Solaa are a band that com- bine jazz improvisation with hip-hop and R & B. Their debut al- bum ‘Steps in Time’ was a long time coming, but well worth the wait
This drink combines dark rum, citrus, hibiscus, vanilla, and Cantabrian red wine, with a soda top. Refreshing and warming at the same time.
Dark Rum, Grapefruit, Hibiscus, Citrus, Honey ,Canterbury Red Wine, Soda

$15

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